Summer solstice at Stonehenge

19 de juny de 2018 at 20:37

Watching the sunrise at Stonehenge on summer solstice. Source@wikimedia commons

Did you know that the summer solstice happens when the sun is in its highest position in the sky as the North Pole tilts towards the sun by 23.4˚? This is the longest day of the year in terms of sunlight as the sun is directly over the Tropic of Capricorn in the Northern Hemisphere. The exact date for this changes every year but it is somewhere around the 21st June. However, this event is not just important for astronomy. In the UK the summer solstice has a direct relationship to the ancient monument Stonehenge.  Read on for more…

November: Gunpowder, treason and plot

22 de novembre de 2017 at 12:36

Have you seen this face? It was made famous in “V for Vendetta” and it is also known as the face of the online activist group Anonymous. Did you know that is the actual face of Guy Fawkes? Guy Fawkes is a very famous English historical figure who tried, and failed, to blow up the The Houses of Parliament in London in 1605. Read all about him here…

 

 

“Fancy a cuppa?”

31 d'octubre de 2016 at 10:09

cup-of-coffee-text

That’s a question you’ve probably never been asked and yet it is uttered tens of thousands of times every day in British households. It means “Would you like a cup of tea?”

Tick, Tock, Tick, Tock, the clocks go back.

27 d'octubre de 2016 at 11:34

Ticking clock

Twice a year we change the time on our clocks and watches. In spring we move them one hour forward and in autumn they go one hour back. When I was at school we were taught two phrasal verbs to help us remember what way to change the hands on the clock; in spring the clocks spring forward and in autumn they fall back. (Fall is the American way of saying autumn). Easy!

Hello, Hello, Hello

27 de setembre de 2016 at 17:00

Hello and welcome to the CIM’s (Centro de Idiomas Modernos, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya) blog. What better way to start off the blog than with a “Hello”. “Hello” is a standard way to greet people, but it hasn’t always been used that way.